Github Introduces Community Standards

In order to set common opensource guidelines for projects hosted in public repositories, github has introduced ways to measure community standards on your repositories. At times you might have wanted to contribute in a open source project, but had no idea how to. Public repositories are free to clone, fork and sent a pull request. But your contribution won’t be accepted unless it meets the motive and objectives set by an individual or a community who moderate that project.

Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could know following things about a repository, so that you could invest some time and skills contributing:

  1. License that a project applies
  2. Description about what’s the project about, tools it uses, and its current state.
  3. Code of Conduct such that we could know ways to be a part of the project and contribute.
  4. Also a Contributing guidelines such that we would know the working mechanisms like reporting a bug, criteria for accepting a pull request, etc after we are a member.

To sum up all the four points, having information about four above mentioned points, your project repository is said to matched the community standards. To know what are open source guidelines for meeting the community standards, Click here.

Out of above mentioned four points github already had two features License and Description.

Currently there are twelve licenses listed as follows which you can fing while creating a new project repository:

  1. Apache License 2.0
  2. GNU General Public License v3.0
  3. MIT License
  4. BSD 2-clause “Simplified” License
  5. BSD 3-clause “New” or “Revised” License
  6. Eclipse Public License 1.0
  7. GNU Affero General Public License v3.0
  8. GNU General Public License v2.0
  9. GNU Lesser General Public License v2.1
  10. GNU Lesser General Public License v3.0
  11. Mozilla Public License 2.0
  12. Unlicense( This means no license at all, set your code free)

Github also has a feature known README  adding details about your projects, which you can choose while creating a new repository. 

For two of the remaining feature github has introduced CODE OF CONDUCT and CONTRIBUTING.

Now in your repository under the Highlights Dropdown you can see a sign of love for Community. This is recently added in Github. Click at the Community and for your repository you will be shown a progress meter which displays if your project meets open standard or not.

Now you can see README, Code of Conduct, Contributing and License on your community profile. In one of my repository, I have only added Readme and License. And the progress bar displays that  my repository meets 50% of the community standards.

From here you can add Code of Conduct and Contributing Guidelines. This is quite simple as adding information inside your Readme. But make sure that your project’s Code of Conduct and Contributing Guidelines are straight forward and strict in a sense it will be transparent for contributors to apply, contribute and promote.

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